RLlib Annotations/Decorators

Throughout the RLlib codebase, we will use the following practical class-, method-, and function decorators:

ray.rllib.utils.annotations.override(cls)[source]

Decorator for documenting method overrides.

Parameters

cls – The superclass that provides the overridden method. If this cls does not actually have the method, an error is raised.

Examples

>>> from ray.rllib.policy import Policy
>>> class TorchPolicy(Policy): 
...     ...
...     # Indicates that `TorchPolicy.loss()` overrides the parent
...     # Policy class' own `loss method. Leads to an error if Policy
...     # does not have a `loss` method.
...     @override(Policy) 
...     def loss(self, model, action_dist, train_batch): 
...         ... 
ray.rllib.utils.annotations.PublicAPI(obj)[source]

Decorator for documenting public APIs.

Public APIs are classes and methods exposed to end users of RLlib. You can expect these APIs to remain stable across RLlib releases.

Subclasses that inherit from a @PublicAPI base class can be assumed part of the RLlib public API as well (e.g., all Algorithm classes are in public API because Algorithm is @PublicAPI).

In addition, you can assume all algo configurations are part of their public API as well.

Examples

>>> # Indicates that the `Algorithm` class is exposed to end users
>>> # of RLlib and will remain stable across RLlib releases.
>>> from ray import tune
>>> @PublicAPI 
>>> class Algorithm(tune.Trainable): 
...     ... 
ray.rllib.utils.annotations.DeveloperAPI(obj)[source]

Decorator for documenting developer APIs.

Developer APIs are classes and methods explicitly exposed to developers for the purposes of building custom algorithms or advanced training strategies on top of RLlib internals. You can generally expect these APIs to be stable sans minor changes (but less stable than public APIs).

Subclasses that inherit from a @DeveloperAPI base class can be assumed part of the RLlib developer API as well.

Examples

>>> # Indicates that the `TorchPolicy` class is exposed to end users
>>> # of RLlib and will remain (relatively) stable across RLlib
>>> # releases.
>>> from ray.rllib.policy import Policy
>>> @DeveloperAPI 
... class TorchPolicy(Policy): 
...     ... 
ray.rllib.utils.annotations.ExperimentalAPI(obj)[source]

Decorator for documenting experimental APIs.

Experimental APIs are classes and methods that are in development and may change at any time in their development process. You should not expect these APIs to be stable until their tag is changed to DeveloperAPI or PublicAPI.

Subclasses that inherit from a @ExperimentalAPI base class can be assumed experimental as well.

Examples

>>> from ray.rllib.policy import Policy
>>> class TorchPolicy(Policy): 
...     ... 
...     # Indicates that the `TorchPolicy.loss` method is a new and
...     # experimental API and may change frequently in future
...     # releases.
...     @ExperimentalAPI 
...     def loss(self, model, action_dist, train_batch): 
...         ... 
ray.rllib.utils.annotations.OverrideToImplementCustomLogic(obj)[source]

Users should override this in their sub-classes to implement custom logic.

Used in Algorithm and Policy to tag methods that need overriding, e.g. Policy.loss().

Examples

>>> from ray.rllib.policy.torch_policy import TorchPolicy
>>> @overrides(TorchPolicy) 
... @OverrideToImplementCustomLogic 
... def loss(self, ...): 
...     # implement custom loss function here ...
...     # ... w/o calling the corresponding `super().loss()` method.
...     ... 
ray.rllib.utils.annotations.OverrideToImplementCustomLogic_CallToSuperRecommended(obj)[source]

Users should override this in their sub-classes to implement custom logic.

Thereby, it is recommended (but not required) to call the super-class’ corresponding method.

Used in Algorithm and Policy to tag methods that need overriding, but the super class’ method should still be called, e.g. Algorithm.setup().

Examples

>>> from ray import tune
>>> @overrides(tune.Trainable) 
... @OverrideToImplementCustomLogic_CallToSuperRecommended 
... def setup(self, config): 
...     # implement custom setup logic here ...
...     super().setup(config) 
...     # ... or here (after having called super()'s setup method.
ray.rllib.utils.annotations.is_overridden(obj)[source]

Check whether a function has been overridden. Note, this only works for API calls decorated with OverrideToImplementCustomLogic or OverrideToImplementCustomLogic_CallToSuperRecommended.